Piracicaba

Esalq - Piracicaba - Ano

In 1877 , by request of the then councilor Prudente de Moraes, later first civilian president of Brazil, the city’s name was officially changed to Piracicaba.

The Piracicabano territory before the official town by the Portuguese Crown was occupied by indigenous peoples. Piracicaba is an indigenous word: “Place where the fish stops” and expresses the idea of ​​abundance of fish.

The way of settlement of Brazil, until 1822, was to land grants. At that time, there were many land concessions in São Paulo hinterland and at least 22 of them in the area of ​​Piracicaba parish. However, like most, these lands were populated when served some interest.

Founded in August 1, 1767, the settler Antonio Correa Barbosa, for the function of constituting the new village chose a rich land in natural materials. Located closer to the road to Itu, right heel edge, Piracicaba served as collateral for gold in Cuiabá and support for vessels down the Rio Tiete giving back to supplying the Fort Iguatemi, on the border with the Spanish territories.

In 1784, the parish was transferred to the left bank of the river, just below the jump, where the best land favored its expansion. The principle only planted to corn consumption, rice, beans and cotton. And in 1836, the small town was renamed Vila Nova Constitution.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, the rural landscape of Piracicaba, had sensitive modifications and due to their relative development, the village was elevated to a town with the same name, with the guiding agriculture highlighting the culture and processing mills of sugarcane. In 1877, by request of the then councilor Prudente de Moraes, later first civilian president of Brazil, the city’s name was officially changed to Piracicaba.

Piracicaba pioneered the industrialization process and fluvial navigation, in São Paulo, but waited for a while Ferrovia. Only in 1922 came the first train from Paulista in the city. The installation of piped water systems, electricity and sewer pipe came to the city in the nineteenth century. Prominent national figures introduced advanced technologies in the city and provided a pioneering situation for Piracicaba in relation to other Brazilian cities, such as: Carlos Zanotta, Luiz de Queiroz, and Saturnino de Brito.

In the mid-twentieth century, Piracicaba with an agro-industrial complex developed, it became known as the Capital of sugar. And, since 1970, it developed an important process of economic diversification in the municipality, with the implementation of a complex industrial park.